A new album, a new approach
While in the past Stereo Total have borrowed freely from a huge pot of influences, the ambitious mission at the onset of the Juke-Box-Alarm project was to create something completely new, disregarding conventions and displaying no respect. A new kind of music, straddling the gap between pop and abstract, a sound that had never been made or heard before. The band tried out all kinds of combinations and succeeded in their mission. A strong dash of technology makes the record gurgle, bleep, and oscillate. Hot Chocolate meets the first Flying Lizards record in the Residents practice room under the supervision of Pierre Henry. Or something like that.

A new album, a new member
Aside from Françoise Cactus (France), Brezel Göring (Germany), and Angie Reed (Italy), San Reimo (Germany) has joined the band for the latest album, adding keyboard skills well-known from his work with Berlin’s Jeans Team.

A new album, a new approach
While in the past Stereo Total have borrowed freely from a huge pot of influences, the ambitious mission at the onset of the Juke-Box-Alarm project was to create something completely new, disregarding conventions and displaying no respect. A new kind of music, straddling the gap between pop and abstract, a sound that had never been made or heard before. The band tried out all kinds of combinations and succeeded in their mission. A strong dash of technology makes the record gurgle, bleep, and oscillate. Hot Chocolate meets the first Flying Lizards record in the Residents practice room under the supervision of Pierre Henry. Or something like that.

A new album, a totally new atmosphere
“Monokini” was built for entertainment, humour and charm, but there are only two tracks on “Juke-Box-Alarm” that maintain this cheeky feel (“Sweet Charlotte” and “Comicstripteasegirl”). The rest of the record is varied: a romantic longing here (“Touche-Moi”, “Les Minets”), deep gloom there (“Vertigo”), and even moments of pain (“Der Schlüssel”). The album is a model for a new type of music – crazier than all German electronic bands put together, more spaced out than deep space, and sinister to the last note. Morbid Disco? It’s just a thought… The menacing atmosphere may be something of a reaction to the endless stream of sweet descriptions of the last record (“oh so charming, so winningly French, so cute…”).

A new album, the same refusal
The Stereos still don’t feel like conforming to the standard, overly-cerebral, wannabe literary approach of most German-language bands. The light touch and spontaneity that has always characterized Stereo Total’s relationship with language remains unchanged on “Juke-Box-Alarm”. And for the first time they have written a song in English – “Holiday Innn”. Of course, francophiles tend to be anglophobic, but this animosity breaks down when the results are this good. The desire for international attention seems to be ever more attainable for Stereo Total, as tours in the US and Japan demonstrate. Their ode to disco music, “Party Anticonformiste,” should be another chance to unite international audiences with a mix of French, German, and English lyrics that everybody should understand.

A new album, a new swimming pool
Everything about “Juke-Box-Alarm,” from the cover to the last sound, is about the absurdity of the world and living in it. Visions of the apocalyptic and bizarre are filtered through images of friendship and love, making the new album simultaneously more spectacular and more intimate. Both sound and text have a new depth. And one thing is for sure: every sound on the album is exactly where it should be, and sounds exactly the way it should sound – like Stereo Total today.

Stereo Total’s third album is a rogue Wurlitzer of a record, following the spirit of “Oh Ah” and “Monokini” while revealing new surprises. On “Monokini” the band followed their interest in sounds from chanson to punk to electronic – on “Juke-Box-Alarm” all the various sounds have been seamlessly woven into one sonic tapestry, the various patterns held together by a constant stream of highly unique synthesizer noises. The album was made in three different studios. First the basic tracks were recorded live on venerable old machines in an authentic 60s studio in Hamburg. Then the tracks were edited, toyed with, and rearranged with a sampler in Berlin. Finally the whole thing was mixed and modified by Kurt Dahlke (Pyrolator) at Atatak Studio in Düsseldorf.

Brezel Göring